Doomsday, May 21st–So Long Suckers!

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Third time’s a charm.
Right, Harold?

According to Harold Camping, the world will end on May 21st. Of course, Harold Camping’s argument is as irrefutable as any given by … uh … any totally random religious organization I might choose to mention. I’m sure cars are being overturned and cats are being set on fire in your front yard as you read this, so you might want to get a head start on hauling ass. Not that it matters. Cuz Jesus is gonna git ya.

Personally, I’m just hoping to get laid by someone with fully functioning lady parts by then. That almost never happens even on a good day. Dammit. So I’ll shower for the big event. You do whatever the hell you want.

Well, at least it wasn’t an elder who made the prediction. Maybe I can avoid the parade of in-laws waving signs about how right they were on my front step after all. That’s why I made sure to buy a home where the front step is so small. Only four of them can gather there at a time without falling off.

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This cement never hardens.
Until someone steps in it.

There are land mines too. That’s why I don’t mow my grass. I have a slip of paper from the state that actually says it’s OK. How sweet is that? Keeps the kids off, too. Mostly. I still have plenty of mines left.

I just had my gallbladder yanked out like a grape off a vine last weekend. Ow. Jesus, couldn’t this have waited until I was on a real vacation or something? I’m just now able to move around without the help of 4 nurses and an ice cream cone for motivation.1 Thanks a helluva lot, Jesus. All knowing and wise? More like all knowing and inconsiderate if you ask me. Guess everything revolves around him and his precious apocalypse. No wonder I’m an atheist. Yeah, I said it.

I suppose no one will be alive to read the end of this post. Too bad. Or will they?

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  1. A life size blow up doll of Alyssa Milano works too. Except my dick gets in the way of the ice cream.

Is That An Attack On The Watchtower Society Or Are You Just Criticizing My Religion?

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Sometimes, we see the
world through two
different pairs of glasses
and we don’t even know it.

Ever since I posted my series about the November AWAKE! articles on atheism, I’ve started seeing more comments from Jehovah’s Witnesses here on Atheist Geek News. Some Witnesses say they only stopped here because they saw my “attack” on the magazine and wanted to defend it (or defend the Watchtower Society by implication as the magazine’s publisher). I take exception to this and wanted to explain my position for future commentators.

Here’s the thing. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with someone posting a rebuttal or offering a criticism to something I’ve written. Especially if what I’ve written is factually incorrect. I just don’t think words like “attack” are warranted here. Unless every criticism against everything is also an attack, that is. At which point, both words become synonymous and it doesn’t matter which one you use.

I would agree that there are hate sites out there run by people who truly hate the organization and its Witnesses. Some of these people are very angry. Some have a reason to be. But I don’t think this is one of those sites. To me, Atheist Geek News is simply a pro-ex-Witness site, one that offers up stuff for atheists and geeks alike. (If you happen to be all three, why not take off your coat and search for a spell?)

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News And Links For Ex-Jehovah’s Witnesses: A Witness Named Corey Nash Was Killed…

Jehovah’s Witness recounts what he saw the day Corey S. Nash was killed in the parking lot of a Saginaw strip mall

SAGINAW — Blake Oliver of Flushing came to Saginaw for a Jehovah’s Witness convention at The Dow Event Center in Saginaw in August; he left a witness to the homicide of Corey S. Nash, 31, of Saginaw.

Monroe man charged with shooting rifle near Jehovah’s Witnesses

Jehovah’s Witnesses, Disfellowshipping and the Art of Civil Disobedience – Year of Sundays

This last Sunday, we did things a little differently. We attended the annual Memorial of Christ’s Death at a “Kingdom Hall” of my religious alma mater—Jehovah’s Witnesses—where I quietly partook of the emblems representing Jesus’ flesh and blood.

“Paying Attention” to: The Watchtower’s Secret Manual for Elders

Jason Barker provides his readers with an overview of the not-so secret Elder’s Manual.

The classification “atypical” by Jehovah’s Witnesses UMP

I found out about that one at JWD. (Thanks to AndersonsInfo.) Here’s the link to the discussion for those who might have missed it. Note that the original article is in French. The link above is a Google translation.

Here’s some more good news circulating. The Society is telling its Witnesses that apostates are “mentally diseased.” Yippie. You know they’ll be calling all inactives and ex-Witnesses that one, too. If you often find yourself locked in mortal combat with overzealous Witnesses, you may as well prepare yourself for this accusation soon. Just a heads up.

Protect Yourself from Liars and Deceivers: Expose those who try to deceive you.

This may sound like the title of a Watchtower article warning Jehovah’s Witnesses about evil apostates, but in fact, it’s a list of suggestions at Psychology Today. It might come in handy the next time your mom cracks up on you because you haven’t been to the Kingdom Hall in a while.

Have you ever wondered… What does it mean to be mentally clean?

From the Society’s own web site. Nuff said.

News And Links For Atheists: Chrispher Hitchens VS Frank Turek

VIDEO: Debate: Christopher Hitchens vs. Frank Turek

VIDEO: Sam Harris vs. William Lane Craig – Does Good Come From God?

The Science of Why We Don’t Believe Science

The Two Kinds Of Belief: Why infants reason better than adults

Proof that religious wording isn’t “secular” or “benign”

When nonreligious Americans object to the words “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, or to “In God We Trust” as the national motto, we often hear opponents claim that the wording is harmless, secular in purpose, and that nobody interprets the words as being a religious affirmation of any kind. Sometimes the excuse given is that such wording merely “acknowledges the nation’s religious heritage.”

Of course, just about every society has some kind of religious heritage, but even if we find it desirable to “acknowledge” America’s religious heritage one could question why we must do so by affirmatively stating that God actually exists. After all, America also has a strong secular heritage – many of our founders were quite anti-clerical, some rejected Christianity and supernatural religion outright, and certainly many of them were far outside the framework of traditional religion. Thus, would we “acknowledge” that secular heritage by affirming in our national Pledge and motto that there is no God?

Here’s a series of articles on Psychology Today where a couple of experts end up debating one another at the same web site.

When The Going Gets Tough, The Atheists Go Praying

Atheism is a luxury of the well-to-do and the comfortable.

This shouldn’t earn the author any hate mail.

Rebutting more outlandish statements about atheists

…Raghunathan’s article provides his personal opinions without going through the pesky exercise of providing supporting evidence. He declares that atheism is “a luxury” that results from having a “comfortable life.” Because atheism seems most prominent in the developed world where people rarely have to worry about their next meal, Raghunathan speculates, we can conclude that material comfort gives rise to atheism.

Gasp! Sick’em, David Niose.

Is Atheism Just Another Faith?

My recent post has attracted considerably more attention than I expected–over 150 comments (at last count) and even a repartee by David Niose. Although I am sorry that my post was offensive to some atheists (and I apologize for that), I am happy that we are at least having this debate. If it is at all conceivable, believe me when I say that my intention is not to insult anyone.

Before I address some of the objections to my thesis–that even hardcore atheists will start praying to God under a sufficiently high level of stress–I would like to state that I am not really a believer in God. More precisely, I do not believe in the kind of God that is typically depicted in most religions, as a somewhat egotistical and even vengeful entity. I should also state that, like most atheists, I believe that religion has overall been a more divisive and harmful force than it has been a unifying and beneficial one. If forced to pick a category to which I belong, I would pick agnostic rather than “believer.” In other words, I am really more closely aligned to atheists than I am to the religious.

That said, I would like to now offer my responses to the five major categories of comments/criticisms that my post generated:

You’ll have to go to the link to see the rest of his response. A similar exchange on Psychology Today can be found here.

P.S. … Today my wife and I celebrate our wedding anniversary. An atheist and a Jehovah’s Witness, and we’ve been married sixteen years. Not too crappy.